Electoral fraud is a serious allegation that must be backed with hard statistical evidence. So I went ahead and analyzed voting results in Florida and Ohio. I compared them to exit polls and to the 2000 election. While my analysis is not exhaustive, I’ve already determined that the results match exit polls to well within the margin of error. (Margin of error for exit polls was between 4% and 6%; all districts I looked at came to within 2-3%.) I also see no statistically meaningful discrepancies between 2000 and 2004 voting patterns, even in districts that used e-voting or optical scan with central database.

Put simply, my preliminary analysis suggests that this was a legitimate election.

I realize that the outcome of the election is difficult for many of my friends to accept. After all, we live in a world where what is right and true is so obvious that the election results do not seem real. In this sort of environment, conspiracy theories will no doubt flourish. But these are merely distractions. A more productive way to move forward is to understand what led our country to this point and to start making decisions about how we can move the boat in a new and better direction.